[Video description and transcript available below]

Nia Lazarus, who is currently an intern with the National Association of the Deaf (NAD), shares some updates with text-to-911. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has created rules requiring text messaging providers to support text-to-911. This is great news for the deaf and hard of hearing community!

Read more: http://nad.org/blogs/08/15/2014/servi…

Video description and transcript:

Video fades to soft blue and white background with the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) logo centered. Video fades to white then fades to Nia Lazarus inside the NAD Headquarters' front lobby.

NIA: The NAD is pleased to share that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has created rules requiring text messaging providers to support text-to-911. While the four major wireless phone companies already support text-to-911 on their networks, these rules require all wireless carriers and many Internet-based text messaging application providers to support text-to-911 by December 31, 2014.

These rules are a huge victory for deaf and hard of hearing Americans. However, this does not mean that it is possible to text to 9-1-1 anywhere in the country yet. Many 9-1-1 centers are not ready to receive text messages now, but this rule makes it possible for wireless carriers and Internet text messaging service providers to pass on texts to 9-1-1 centers.

So, what's next? We encourage all of you to reach out to local 9-1-1 centers and ask that they upgrade their equipment to accept text-to-911 messages. Once they do, everyone will be able to text to 9-1-1, and no relay is necessary for these communications.

ON-SCREEN TEXT: To find your local 9-1-1 call center: www.nad.org/9-1-1callcenters. Please note: the above link provides a list of 9-1-1 call centers, but it doesn't include their contact information. You will need to do a search online for your call center's contact info.

NIA: The NAD has long advocated for direct access to 9-1-1 services so that deaf and hard of hearing people can quickly, easily and directly communicate with 9-1-1 operators. For many deaf and hard of hearing people, the easiest way to contact 9-1-1 is through text messaging. In emergencies, every minute counts.

We really deeply appreciate the support of FCC Chairman Wheeler, Commissioner Clyburn, and Commissioner Rosenworcel who made history with these new rules.

Video fades to the same soft blue and white background with the NAD logo centered. Black text below the logo appears, "A production of The National Association of the Deaf (copyright) 2014 All Rights Reserved"